MasterClass – Thomas Keller – Puree Potatoes

https://www.masterclass.com/classes/thomas-keller-teaches-cooking-techniques/chapters/potato-puree/watch

  • Puree vs mashed potatoes are not the same
  • The French have “refined” mashed potatoes to pureed potatoes
  • Potatoes to use
    • Lorat – French like these but hard to find here in US
    • Red bliss aren’t good (get gummy when mashed)
    • Russet aren’t good for pureed potatoes (good for traditional mashed potatoes)
    • Use Yukon gold (very dense)
  • Dense potatoes (Yukon/lorat) can hold lots (and lots) of fat
  • Cooking
    • Keep potatoes in their jacket when boiling
    • Start in cold water and then bring up to temp (avoids breaking skin)
    • Cook till no resistance
  • Use a “tame” (drum sieve)
    • Put potatoes in (leaving skins on)
    • Cut potato in half
    • Use a screen that is the very finest
    • Use a bench scraper and push the potato thru drum sieve (much finer than rice sieve)
    • Skin is left behind and easily removed
    • Must do the pressing while potatoes when hot
    • Notice the aroma … should smell done
  • Put parchment paper under the tame … helps to keep things clean/efficient
  • The tame can be used for many other vegetables … parsnips, peas, carrots, etc to make puree
  • Finishing puree
    • Clarified butter (has more pure butter flavor vs whole butter)
    • Cream
    • Water
    • Butter
    • Put potatoes in a pot and over medium flame
    • Start by adding cream and stir vigorously (stirring vigorously always needed throughout the process)
    • Work on/off flame … the more fat added the less needed or else fat will break
    • Add cream, butter, clarified butter, water to get desired flavor and texture
    • This mixture can take an enormous amount of fats and much thinner than typical American mashed potatoes
    • Add salt as desired to “enhance”
    • Add pepper (either black or white) to change flavor profile
    • When done, the pureed potatoes will almost flow from the pan (unlike typical mashed potatoes)
  • Serving
    • As normally for mashed potatoes
    • As a garnish

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